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[REQUEST] Minecraft Java edition

This is my 2nd try, i really want to play it with mods and maps so badly
Hello reddit, im a very avid minecraft fan who has liked the game since a long time and i played it on phone and ps4, the thing is that i always wanted to try the real deal, which is the java edition for pc, why? Becuase it has access to mods, skins and the fact that you can join to all the servers without restrictions, thats why i want it so badly
To start lets describe what is minecraft about
Minecraft is a gamr about building and exploring and figthing monsters in an (almost) infite world. Minecraft has 3 gamemodes Survival, where you gather stuff to survive, earn ores and build your epic base, this gets better with mods, which can change the game with big changes
Then there is creative which you can make anything than you want from epic builds and giant redstone contraptions, i really want to play this mode on pc becuase i could share cozy builds
And finally, adventure mode, which you can play it on an user made map where you can fight each others or find the exit, theres so much to do!!!
The problem is that minecraft even as a 10 years old game is still TOO expensive and at this moment i cant buy anything because i need to spend my money on more important things, so thats why i decided to create this thread to see if there is a kind person who could give me minecraft java edition as a gift, i really would appreciate because i think is the best game ever made and i want to play it how it was meant to be, with mods and friends, i always wanted it to play it for free but i dont trust those launchers because they could have bitcoin miners and keyloggers, so i prefered to be safe and make a request in this cool place
Thats it, ill just wait and hope :)
https://psnprofiles.com/Noaloh
http://steamcommunity.com/id/m71n
submitted by Realoh to GiftofGames [link] [comments]

[REQUEST] Minecraft java edition

Hello reddit, im a very avid minecraft fan who has liked the game since a long time and i played it on phone and ps4, the thing is that i always wanted to try the real deal, which is the java edition for pc, why? Becuase it has access to mods, skins and the fact that you can join to all the servers without restrictions, thats why i want it so badly
To start lets describe what is minecraft about
Minecraft is a gamr about building and exploring and figthing monsters in an (almost) infite world. Minecraft has 3 gamemodes Survival, where you gather stuff to survive, earn ores and build your epic base, this gets better with mods, which can change the game with big changes
Then there is creative which you can make anything than you want from epic builds and giant redstone contraptions, i really want to play this mode on pc becuase i could share cozy builds
And finally, adventure mode, which you can play it on an user made map where you can fight each others or find the exit, theres so much to do!!!
The problem is that minecraft even as a 10 years old game is still TOO expensive and at this moment i cant buy anything because i need to spend my money on more important things, so thats why i decided to create this thread to see if there is a kind person who could give me minecraft java edition as a gift, i really would appreciate because i think is the best game ever made and i want to play it how it was meant to be, with mods and friends, i always wanted it to play it for free but i dont trust those launchers because they could have bitcoin miners and keyloggers, so i prefered to be safe and make a request in this cool place
Thats it, ill just wait and hope :)
submitted by Realoh to GiftofGames [link] [comments]

The next halving and why you should own a bitcoin or two.

I have been able to get some very successful people into bitcoin over the past year. Even during this bear market I have stayed extremely positive. My predictions that I have presented to people have been extremely accurate.
I grew up in a small town in West Virginia. When I was 12 years old my family moved to an even smaller town called Salem WV. Early 1990s. I was starving for communication and social interaction. One day a kid I went to school with invited me over to play his PS1, a game called Loaded had just came out. While we were playing I heard a young man yelling and smashing something. I asked what it was, he said it was his teenage brother. So I walked to his room and there sat a 16 year old with a broken keyboard, irate at his dos screen. I asked him why he was mad, he told me about this thing called the internet. You can talk to people online he said. He was designing a search engine he proclaimed. He showed me how to hook in a phone line so we could send data back and worth when I was home in the country from my computer. He gave me an AOL mod account he hacked and something called AOHell. I quickly found out I could make people online have a terrible experience, I could also trade porn files peer to peer.
I transferred back to a school in the city when I was 15. The gang I ran with rode skateboards. We went to one of my friends houses and in his room with 5 other guys I noticed a computer in the corner. I told them that I could hook a phone line to the back and get porn for free. No one believed me, so that's what I did. The kid was amazed that I could get magic naked girls to appear out of no where. He yelled for his mom to see. I wasn't allowed to come back after that.
I later figured out how to use my scanner at 16 years old and to change my newly issued drivers license age to 21. Soon many of my friends were able to buy beer. I got into trouble over that and then they put holograms on the new IDs.
I figured out how to set up a hacked copy of recording software. Set up a studio to record rap songs when I was 20 years old. It was very exciting.
This is a pattern with technology I have repeated over and over. It's fascinating to me. What can be accomplished with the internet. It is complete freedom.
I ran into bitcoin years ago. A buddy of mine in South Korea told me about it online. So I decided to research it and fell in love with the design. Before this in 2007 I had designed a business and posted it online. It was about taking digital properties off one platform and selling them to other people. In world of warcraft you could mine ore or gold and sell it to other players on Ebay. This was very intriguing to me. I feel very connected to bitcoin because of certain similarities and parallels.
I followed and tinkered with it a bit and fell in love. I never really thought about it as the best investment in the world until the last halving in 2016 and saw what happened in 2017. I remember bitcoin hitting $2000 and thinking it was scary. You couldn't go wrong then and everyone involved looked like a genius. I'd tell people it was going to hit $10,000. Then it did and a couple of my friends sold theirs. I always just spent mine. These crypto charts speak to me. I'm here because I believe I am the best at what I do. I knew the market would turn bear.
It's been very good to me on the small holdings I've been able to accumulate. I came to reddit 6 months ago when John Oliver roasted bitcoin. He said there were hundreds of thousands of people here that were like me. I'm very glad I came and today is my 6 month old birthday on reddit and I've meant some amazing people. Thought I would share in my favorite sub.
What I believe is next:
Bitcoin is a deflationary currency guaranteed to go up in value. This bear market could last a while, it could end this month. It could also stay at a 6000 dollar to 7000 for the next year. What I do know for a fact is that when it is 2021 bitcoin will be over 6 figures. I'd like to think we will be over 10,000 by 2019. The next halving is going to be mid 2020. The 12.5 bitcoin miner reward gets cut to 6.25. What I would recommend you do between now and the next halving is accumulate as much bitcoin as possible. You cannot go wrong at 6000 to 7000, in a 3 to 5 year hold it really won't matter. I am mining and buying as much as possible to this day. If you are sitting on 1 bitcoin come 2025, you'll be very wealthy and never have to work. Things will be very different then. Get your satoshis up and hodl tight. There is no better investment in the world.
Thank you reddit for having me, cheers.
N8
submitted by N8twon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Implications of Bitcoin (x-post from r/cryptocurrency)

This is starting to develop into a series of posts (here is the first one on both steemit and reddit), I've thrown this post on steemit, though the full text is available here. My next post is already half done and will deal with wallets, personal security, and the future therein. A table of contents is on the way that will help organize these.
I realize many here are familiar with a lot of this information, but I aim to present it in a way that's understandable to people that haven't yet spent the time to research for hours. I would appreciate any comments or criticism in order to refine the ideas. I'm not trying to shill anything in particular, though I reference bitcoin specifically for a lot of reasons I won't go into right here, most if not all of what I explain could be applied to other cryptos. I don't wish to encourage people to "invest" in this tech, I only wish that they begin to learn about it. I think this technology will change the world no matter what we do right now, I simply wish to explain in plain English how it might benefit our global society.

The Implications of Bitcoin - Deciphering the Enigma

Money is one of the oldest technologies; it's older than writing; we know this because the first writing we find is keeping track of transactions. Money has held many forms (rock, bone, metal, paper, cloth, plastic, etc.), each generation of token ideally being more portable and harder to forge. Portability, (ease of moving around the tokens) increases what you can do with it, while forgeability describes how secure it is against counterfeiters. Modern banking is essentially impossible to forge, and is vastly more portable than physical tokens because it exists solely on banking networks. For those with access to modern banks, money has never been more free to move around. Enter Bitcoin; it is no less forgeable than its predecessor,but it's portability is exponentially increased, and being decentralized it introduces a new feature, it's open to everyone.

What is Bitcoin?

At first glance bitcoin appears very similar to how we already transact in the developed world; it's "just" digital money. We have paypal, venmo, online banking, and credit cards that allow us to move our money around. However, to call bitcoin similar is making a huge mistake and vastly misunderstanding its concept, philosophy, and power. Modern banking services are exclusive to the developed world and only accessed with the permission of for-profit, private institutions, the gatekeepers of local and global money transfer. In the developing world there are billions of people without access to any bank, and many more have limited access to even basic services. Often there's little competition which stifles innovation and increases monopolistic practices. It's these citizens of our global society that stand to benefit most from this technology in an immediate sense.
Bitcoin is a decentralized, open, and immutable means of exchanging value. There are several layers to this concept alone; most significantly, that bitcoin is fundamentally different from anything we have ever contemplated. This makes it difficult to understand the implications or benefits of such a revolutionary technology. It's an epochal shift in how we can transact and store value.
This system can be accessed by everyone, anywhere, anytime. It is neutral, trans-national, and facilitates the freedom of money. Bitcoin itself requires no personal information or account creation through a business, nation, or organization. One simply generates keys and is free to transact with anyone. There isn't a central authority to dictate who can and can't use the network, no gatekeepers, no one to freeze payments or hold funds.

How is Bitcoin Secure?

I think people are well-justified to be skeptical of bitcoin's security, it's often touted as "unhackable" or "immutable". I try not to speak in absolutes; so I simply state that it's not worth trying to hack because its security lies in cryptography and game-theory.
If you guessed my private key you could spend coins associated with that address. Computers can guess many times in a a second, but even with every computer on the planet it would take much longer than the universe has existed to guess the private keys to a single bitcoin address. This is still true even with 1,000 earths worth of computing power. This is cryptographic security.
Game theory sounds daunting but it's easy to understand, it's "the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers." In bitcoin this manifests through "proof of work" which amounts to "miners" using computers to do lots of math problems, the results of which get embedded in the transaction record (the blockchain), and they receive rewards for their effort of mining a block. Miners are incentivized to contribute to the system.

So what if we try to cheat?

The amount of money and resources required to assemble enough computing power to even attempt to cheat the system (the "51% attack") would cost more than any benefits of doing so because the attack has no guarantee of working, and it would be obvious to anyone looking at the transaction record. In some cases the cheating transaction could be routed-around, essentially erased, negating all the work put in by the attacker who still had to pony up all the computing hardware and electricity. It's simply more profitable to take those computing resources and just mine bitcoins instead of attempting an attack. Game theory at its finest.
Many criticize the computing power and electricity "wasted" on bitcoin mining. Another perspective is that all this computational expenditure is quite intentional because it maintains the security of the system. It's analogous to mining gold; gold ore is just a pile of rocks that require significant extraction and refining to yield highly valuable and useful gold. Bitcoin's proof of work is so-called because the blockchain is evidence of massive computation, that computation equals security. The security is what makes bitcoin valuable. The proof of work is the proof that energy and computing power were expended in securing a history that can never be altered. Furthermore, renewable energy can increasingly provide electricity for miners mitigating environmental concerns. Not to mention the environmental impact of continuously replacing paper currencies in hundreds of countries, gold mining resources "wasted" on gold just to sit in vaults, or all of the concrete and steel poured into thousands of banks across the globe.

What can it do?

Right now citizens of Venezuela are losing purchasing power of their money by 25,000% per year. Their failing government continues printing more money robbing constituents of their savings. When this happened in Zimbabwe and people needed wheelbarrows full of money to buy a single loaf of bread the residents had little recourse. But some Venezuelan locals are turning to crypto-currencies to flee the currency crisis, escape the inflation, and protect their ability to acquire food and shelter. It's capital flight away from a national currency without having to even leave their neighborhood because their $20 cell phone can now act like a global bank.
Global remittances account for over 500 billion dollars a year. International money transfer services require physically being near the local office during business hours. A fair amount of coordination is required to find an institution with local access in both countries. Transfers can take days to clear, and fees vary wildly and make it difficult to transfer small amounts. Bitcoin can send a transaction at any time from your phone to anywhere on the globe in seconds with negligible fees without any intermediary. It's not hard to see why in some places this industry is being heavily disrupted.
Credit cards are a "pull" system, meaning you give out your card number and anyone can pull money from it, this model is the cause of credit and debit card fraud. If your card info is ever compromised you will need a replacement card and sometimes have to fight with institutions for weeks, months, or years to get your money back or have your credit restored. Bitcoin is a "push" system, only you can spend your money. No fees or extra charges can ever be added without you manually sending them. Automatic payments can be set up on your end, but never "their" end.
Bitcoin is programmable and flexible, allowing money to flow around the world as easily as cat videos and memes. It can mimic the way we do business currently when we desire, but, so much more is possible that will never be viable with our current systems. In fact, we haven't even figured out what yet is possible because innovation has just begun. Until now the only ones that could innovate in the financial space are those with the connections to permissioned worldwide banking network. Now, a 19 year-old has created a global computer whereby the programs can never be silenced and money itself can be programmed. Ultimately this enables anyone to write the next killer banking app without permission from anyone; it's a free market of money. And we are just getting started.
submitted by mrcoolbp to CryptoTechnology [link] [comments]

In-Game Economy Systems: Cryptocurrency and Markets

It was loosely stated in an interview recently that there's ideas in the VR team about economy systems and wanting marketplaces to be a thing. This is super interesting to me, so I decided to write a big mess of words going on about a system I think would be interesting.
( https://www.mmorpg.com/pantheon-rise-of-the-fallen/interviews/our-twitchcon-2017-chat-with-brad-mcquaid-and-corey-lefever-1000012318/page/2 )
Apologies for how long this goes on, but it's a complicated topic and I wanted to try to flesh it out a little to provide context to the idea.
Economy systems in MMO have always been really tricky--they all suffer from the same fatal flaw as time goes on: inflation. Inflation causes a breaking point in which the currency becomes nearly pointless. Purchasing supplies goes from being something you think about early on to being something you ignore entirely once you reach a point where the money you're injecting into the game world is sufficiently large enough.
The worst offender of inflation are in-game merchants. These infinite-money machines all accept any amount of goods for a pre-determined value. The value of these items never changes, it's always the same, forever, and that doesn't make all that much sense. Eventually, the cumulative in-game currency becomes enormous, prices begin to sky-rocket, it's silly.
But what if an MMO implemented the concepts we can see in Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin? What if we took this concept of a finite money source and wrapped it in an open market economy system, where various cities have their own markets with their own values on goods or services?
In bitcoins, the high level premise is that there are only a certain quantity of Bitcoins that can exist. Each time a bitcoin is mined, it becomes harder to mine another. A bitcoin can be subdivided into smaller units (much like Dollars and Pennies in the US). This produces an extremely complex, but self-adjusting economic system. Their perceived value adjusts based on how many are in circulation, and how much on average a person would have.
So to go back to my original question, while the system is far more complex to introduce than the standard "Items are sold to merchants for flat values and every expansion we just make things sell for more that you can go farm", I think it would be hugely impressive to implement a system similar to Bitcoins for an MMO.
So how would this work?
Here's what I would propose, I'll phrase it relative to EverQuest's economy system: Platinum, gold, silver, copper. NOTE: The examples I'm using aren't perfect, they're just to demonstrate the idea.
Step 1: Set a hard-cap on how much Platinum exists in the world. Let's just imagine that 2,000,000,000 platinum exists. At the beginning of a server's life, this is the cap, it won't all exist at once, but at a certain point it will.
Step 2: Design a system to distribute this Platinum into existence over time. This is the tricky part. Defining the parameters in which money is allowed to enter the system and be taken from the pool of available resources. The key to these sorts of systems is that we're effectively trying to get the players to require some kind of input and receive pieces of a platinum back out of it.
I have a few suggestions:
-- Merchants will inject money into the system, based on inflation, with purchase orders for simple goods that players can satisfy. Not everything, mind, only commonly found simple items for the most part. Perhaps you can sell a stack of spider silk for 10 silver to a merchant. Over time though, as more Platinum is injected into the system, this price drops.
-- Humanoid enemies will also provide money, also based on inflation rates, meaning over time the amount of money they'll produce becomes smaller. If the value of platinum increases then we don't want these monsters carrying a disproportionate amount of money, so the quantity is going down because the value is going up. The implication is that these humanoid enemies would understand this to some extent and value money proportionally to the way merchants value money.
Step 3: Incorporate a market-based economy in the game. I think this is a critical piece of the puzzle. A second, more important idea that has to be tied closely with this step, is that all items must have value in the game. Nothing in the game can be truly, genuinely useless. None of the "vendor trash" items. It cannot exist, because those items have no perceived value to the market. All items in the game must either be components to construct other items or be the end result of those components. A sword must be able to be broken down into components, the blade must be able to be smelted back down into a small ingot to be used elsewhere.
Refer to games like Eve Online for prime examples of market economies within a game. Let's expand our example from before, the stack of spider silk. We've established that various merchants may have Purchase Orders for Spider Silk at ~10 silver. Any player can sell a stack to the merchant for 10 silver. But if Players are crafters, they need this spider silk. To compete, they'll have to place a Purchase Order for more than the merchants will buy it for. You, as the holder of spider silk, surely want the best price for your silk, so you go with the player who's willing to buy it for more than the merchant.
As prices begin to drop however, players who are looking to buy Spider Silk don't want to get gouged! So they lower their Purchase Order as well, still higher than merchants, but less than it used to be.
This also goes the other way! As the owner of the silk, you've gotta find the best price. To continue the examples, if you were to go to the market in Cabilis, your silk would be worth very little. It's stupidly plentiful in the Field of Bone. However, if you were to travel to the Faydark market, perhaps this silk is worth more as spiders were substantially less common there. Provided you have enough silk, it may be worth the trip to get a great price over in Faydark.
Another important piece of this part, is that all market transactions would be taxed, putting that money back into the pool of global economy. People will always be generating money from bad guys, or other ways that maybe I haven't thought of.
Summary: A limit on total currency, a system in which the amount of money dispersed is controlled, and a market-based economy. I don't think the system I proposed is perfect, there's definitely holes in it, I think the player input -> money injecting into the system needs to be ironed out more. It may also require that a system is in place for money to exit back into the pool. But I think the core concept sounds fun and interesting. Eve Online demonstrates to us that a complex economy system can drive a very unique, complex gameplay experience for users.
In the end, I think a system like this is really healthy for a game to have lots of horizontal progress--it encourages you to do things. It allows pure-crafters to exist, as they aim to purchase materials for cheap to craft and sell their goods for good money. People can be adventurers, or bandits, or guards, or crafters, all contributing to the economy in their own way. Adventurers will want to explore dungeons to find the great loot there; maybe for their own desire, maybe though they have a contract to obtain and bring an item back. Maybe you're there to supress the undead in a mine so miners can get in and mine some rare and valuable ore deposits, to craft really great armor and weapons.
Thanks for reading!
submitted by EchoLocation8 to PantheonMMO [link] [comments]

The Implications of Bitcoin

This is starting to develop into a series of posts (here is the first one on both steemit and reddit), I've thrown this post on steemit, though the full text is available here. My next post is already half done and will deal with wallets, personal security, and the future therein. A table of contents is on the way that will help organize these.
I realize many here are familiar with a lot of this information, but I aim to present it in a way that's understandable to people that haven't yet spent the time to research for hours. I would appreciate any comments or criticism in order to refine the ideas. I'm not trying to shill anything in particular, though I reference bitcoin specifically for a lot of reasons I won't go into right here, most if not all of what I explain could be applied to other cryptos. I don't wish to encourage people to "invest" in this tech, I only wish that they begin to learn about it. I think this technology will change the world no matter what we do right now, I simply wish to explain in plain English how it might benefit our global society.

The Implications of Bitcoin - Deciphering the Enigma

Money is one of the oldest technologies; it's older than writing; we know this because the first writing we find is keeping track of transactions. Money has held many forms (rock, bone, metal, paper, cloth, plastic, etc.), each generation of token ideally being more portable and harder to forge. Portability, (ease of moving around the tokens) increases what you can do with it, while forgeability describes how secure it is against counterfeiters. Modern banking is essentially impossible to forge, and is vastly more portable than physical tokens because it exists solely on banking networks. For those with access to modern banks, money has never been more free to move around. Enter Bitcoin; it is no less forgeable than its predecessor,but it's portability is exponentially increased, and being decentralized it introduces a new feature, it's open to everyone.

What is Bitcoin?

At first glance bitcoin appears very similar to how we already transact in the developed world; it's "just" digital money. We have paypal, venmo, online banking, and credit cards that allow us to move our money around. However, to call bitcoin similar is making a huge mistake and vastly misunderstanding its concept, philosophy, and power. Modern banking services are exclusive to the developed world and only accessed with the permission of for-profit, private institutions, the gatekeepers of local and global money transfer. In the developing world there are billions of people without access to any bank, and many more have limited access to even basic services. Often there's little competition which stifles innovation and increases monopolistic practices. It's these citizens of our global society that stand to benefit most from this technology in an immediate sense.
Bitcoin is a decentralized, open, and immutable means of exchanging value. There are several layers to this concept alone; most significantly, that bitcoin is fundamentally different from anything we have ever contemplated. This makes it difficult to understand the implications or benefits of such a revolutionary technology. It's an epochal shift in how we can transact and store value.
This system can be accessed by everyone, anywhere, anytime. It is neutral, trans-national, and facilitates the freedom of money. Bitcoin itself requires no personal information or account creation through a business, nation, or organization. One simply generates keys and is free to transact with anyone. There isn't a central authority to dictate who can and can't use the network, no gatekeepers, no one to freeze payments or hold funds.

How is Bitcoin Secure?

I think people are well-justified to be skeptical of bitcoin's security, it's often touted as "unhackable" or "immutable". I try not to speak in absolutes; so I simply state that it's not worth trying to hack because its security lies in cryptography and game-theory.
If you guessed my private key you could spend coins associated with that address. Computers can guess many times in a a second, but even with every computer on the planet it would take much longer than the universe has existed to guess the private keys to a single bitcoin address. This is still true even with 1,000 earths worth of computing power. This is cryptographic security.
Game theory sounds daunting but it's easy to understand, it's "the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers." In bitcoin this manifests through "proof of work" which amounts to "miners" using computers to do lots of math problems, the results of which get embedded in the transaction record (the blockchain), and they receive rewards for their effort of mining a block. Miners are incentivized to contribute to the system.

So what if we try to cheat?

The amount of money and resources required to assemble enough computing power to even attempt to cheat the system (the "51% attack") would cost more than any benefits of doing so because the attack has no guarantee of working, and it would be obvious to anyone looking at the transaction record. In some cases the cheating transaction could be routed-around, essentially erased, negating all the work put in by the attacker who still had to pony up all the computing hardware and electricity. It's simply more profitable to take those computing resources and just mine bitcoins instead of attempting an attack. Game theory at its finest.
Many criticize the computing power and electricity "wasted" on bitcoin mining. Another perspective is that all this computational expenditure is quite intentional because it maintains the security of the system. It's analogous to mining gold; gold ore is just a pile of rocks that require significant extraction and refining to yield highly valuable and useful gold. Bitcoin's proof of work is so-called because the blockchain is evidence of massive computation, that computation equals security. The security is what makes bitcoin valuable. The proof of work is the proof that energy and computing power were expended in securing a history that can never be altered. Furthermore, renewable energy can increasingly provide electricity for miners mitigating environmental concerns. Not to mention the environmental impact of continuously replacing paper currencies in hundreds of countries, gold mining resources "wasted" on gold just to sit in vaults, or all of the concrete and steel poured into thousands of banks across the globe.

What can it do?

Right now citizens of Venezuela are losing purchasing power of their money by 25,000% per year. Their failing government continues printing more money robbing constituents of their savings. When this happened in Zimbabwe and people needed wheelbarrows full of money to buy a single loaf of bread the residents had little recourse. But some Venezuelan locals are turning to crypto-currencies to flee the currency crisis, escape the inflation, and protect their ability to acquire food and shelter. It's capital flight away from a national currency without having to even leave their neighborhood because their $20 cell phone can now act like a global bank.
Global remittances account for over 500 billion dollars a year. International money transfer services require physically being near the local office during business hours. A fair amount of coordination is required to find an institution with local access in both countries. Transfers can take days to clear, and fees vary wildly and make it difficult to transfer small amounts. Bitcoin can send a transaction at any time from your phone to anywhere on the globe in seconds with negligible fees without any intermediary. It's not hard to see why in some places this industry is being heavily disrupted.
Credit cards are a "pull" system, meaning you give out your card number and anyone can pull money from it, this model is the cause of credit and debit card fraud. If your card info is ever compromised you will need a replacement card and sometimes have to fight with institutions for weeks, months, or years to get your money back or have your credit restored. Bitcoin is a "push" system, only you can spend your money. No fees or extra charges can ever be added without you manually sending them. Automatic payments can be set up on your end, but never "their" end.
Bitcoin is programmable and flexible, allowing money to flow around the world as easily as cat videos and memes. It can mimic the way we do business currently when we desire, but, so much more is possible that will never be viable with our current systems. In fact, we haven't even figured out what yet is possible because innovation has just begun. Until now the only ones that could innovate in the financial space are those with the connections to permissioned worldwide banking network. Now, a 19 year-old has created a global computer whereby the programs can never be silenced and money itself can be programmed. Ultimately this enables anyone to write the next killer banking app without permission from anyone; it's a free market of money. And we are just getting started.
submitted by mrcoolbp to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Implications of Bitcoin (x-post)

This is starting to develop into a series of posts (here is the first one on both steemit and reddit), I've thrown this post on steemit, though the full text is available here. My next post is already half done and will deal with wallets, personal security, and the future therein. A table of contents is on the way that will help organize these.
I realize many here are familiar with a lot of this information, but I aim to present it in a way that's understandable to people that haven't yet spent the time to research for hours. I would appreciate any comments or criticism in order to refine the ideas. I'm not trying to shill anything in particular, though I reference bitcoin specifically for a lot of reasons I won't go into right here, most if not all of what I explain could be applied to other cryptos. I don't wish to encourage people to "invest" in this tech, I only wish that they begin to learn about it. I think this technology will change the world no matter what we do right now, I simply wish to explain in plain English how it might benefit our global society.

The Implications of Bitcoin - Deciphering the Enigma

Money is one of the oldest technologies; it's older than writing; we know this because the first writing we find is keeping track of transactions. Money has held many forms (rock, bone, metal, paper, cloth, plastic, etc.), each generation of token ideally being more portable and harder to forge. Portability, (ease of moving around the tokens) increases what you can do with it, while forgeability describes how secure it is against counterfeiters. Modern banking is essentially impossible to forge, and is vastly more portable than physical tokens because it exists solely on banking networks. For those with access to modern banks, money has never been more free to move around. Enter Bitcoin; it is no less forgeable than its predecessor,but it's portability is exponentially increased, and being decentralized it introduces a new feature, it's open to everyone.

What is Bitcoin?

At first glance bitcoin appears very similar to how we already transact in the developed world; it's "just" digital money. We have paypal, venmo, online banking, and credit cards that allow us to move our money around. However, to call bitcoin similar is making a huge mistake and vastly misunderstanding its concept, philosophy, and power. Modern banking services are exclusive to the developed world and only accessed with the permission of for-profit, private institutions, the gatekeepers of local and global money transfer. In the developing world there are billions of people without access to any bank, and many more have limited access to even basic services. Often there's little competition which stifles innovation and increases monopolistic practices. It's these citizens of our global society that stand to benefit most from this technology in an immediate sense.
Bitcoin is a decentralized, open, and immutable means of exchanging value. There are several layers to this concept alone; most significantly, that bitcoin is fundamentally different from anything we have ever contemplated. This makes it difficult to understand the implications or benefits of such a revolutionary technology. It's an epochal shift in how we can transact and store value.
This system can be accessed by everyone, anywhere, anytime. It is neutral, trans-national, and facilitates the freedom of money. Bitcoin itself requires no personal information or account creation through a business, nation, or organization. One simply generates keys and is free to transact with anyone. There isn't a central authority to dictate who can and can't use the network, no gatekeepers, no one to freeze payments or hold funds.

How is Bitcoin Secure?

I think people are well-justified to be skeptical of bitcoin's security, it's often touted as "unhackable" or "immutable". I try not to speak in absolutes; so I simply state that it's not worth trying to hack because its security lies in cryptography and game-theory.
If you guessed my private key you could spend coins associated with that address. Computers can guess many times in a a second, but even with every computer on the planet it would take much longer than the universe has existed to guess the private keys to a single bitcoin address. This is still true even with 1,000 earths worth of computing power. This is cryptographic security.
Game theory sounds daunting but it's easy to understand, it's "the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers." In bitcoin this manifests through "proof of work" which amounts to "miners" using computers to do lots of math problems, the results of which get embedded in the transaction record (the blockchain), and they receive rewards for their effort of mining a block. Miners are incentivized to contribute to the system.

So what if we try to cheat?

The amount of money and resources required to assemble enough computing power to even attempt to cheat the system (the "51% attack") would cost more than any benefits of doing so because the attack has no guarantee of working, and it would be obvious to anyone looking at the transaction record. In some cases the cheating transaction could be routed-around, essentially erased, negating all the work put in by the attacker who still had to pony up all the computing hardware and electricity. It's simply more profitable to take those computing resources and just mine bitcoins instead of attempting an attack. Game theory at its finest.
Many criticize the computing power and electricity "wasted" on bitcoin mining. Another perspective is that all this computational expenditure is quite intentional because it maintains the security of the system. It's analogous to mining gold; gold ore is just a pile of rocks that require significant extraction and refining to yield highly valuable and useful gold. Bitcoin's proof of work is so-called because the blockchain is evidence of massive computation, that computation equals security. The security is what makes bitcoin valuable. The proof of work is the proof that energy and computing power were expended in securing a history that can never be altered. Furthermore, renewable energy can increasingly provide electricity for miners mitigating environmental concerns. Not to mention the environmental impact of continuously replacing paper currencies in hundreds of countries, gold mining resources "wasted" on gold just to sit in vaults, or all of the concrete and steel poured into thousands of banks across the globe.

What can it do?

Right now citizens of Venezuela are losing purchasing power of their money by 25,000% per year. Their failing government continues printing more money robbing constituents of their savings. When this happened in Zimbabwe and people needed wheelbarrows full of money to buy a single loaf of bread the residents had little recourse. But some Venezuelan locals are turning to crypto-currencies to flee the currency crisis, escape the inflation, and protect their ability to acquire food and shelter. It's capital flight away from a national currency without having to even leave their neighborhood because their $20 cell phone can now act like a global bank.
Global remittances account for over 500 billion dollars a year. International money transfer services require physically being near the local office during business hours. A fair amount of coordination is required to find an institution with local access in both countries. Transfers can take days to clear, and fees vary wildly and make it difficult to transfer small amounts. Bitcoin can send a transaction at any time from your phone to anywhere on the globe in seconds with negligible fees without any intermediary. It's not hard to see why in some places this industry is being heavily disrupted.
Credit cards are a "pull" system, meaning you give out your card number and anyone can pull money from it, this model is the cause of credit and debit card fraud. If your card info is ever compromised you will need a replacement card and sometimes have to fight with institutions for weeks, months, or years to get your money back or have your credit restored. Bitcoin is a "push" system, only you can spend your money. No fees or extra charges can ever be added without you manually sending them. Automatic payments can be set up on your end, but never "their" end.
Bitcoin is programmable and flexible, allowing money to flow around the world as easily as cat videos and memes. It can mimic the way we do business currently when we desire, but, so much more is possible that will never be viable with our current systems. In fact, we haven't even figured out what yet is possible because innovation has just begun. Until now the only ones that could innovate in the financial space are those with the connections to permissioned worldwide banking network. Now, a 19 year-old has created a global computer whereby the programs can never be silenced and money itself can be programmed. Ultimately this enables anyone to write the next killer banking app without permission from anyone; it's a free market of money. And we are just getting started.
submitted by mrcoolbp to btc [link] [comments]

OP-ED On Current Concerns In Bitcoin

I have been in the Bitcoin space for a while now. Not exactly an old hat but definitely not exactly a “fledgling” either. I have a couple things to say about the Bitcoin ecosystem, at the moment, that I feel haven’t been talked about enough. Who doesn’t right? You know the old adage, opinions and assholes.
I will start with some of the more recent developments because everyone seems to be up in arms about it. Covert ASICBOOST. Is it good? Should it be killed with software fire? More importantly, cui bono? IMO, attackers. There is no proof that Bitmain is currently running Covert ASICBOOST to get a competitive advantage over other miners. Sure they did implement the chips and/or use ASICBOOST on testnet, but from a hardware development standpoint it makes sense. You want your hardware to be as robust and effective as possible. I want an Intel 6950X to run Speedrunners (2D racing platformer game with low processing need for those not in the know). Sweet hardware, but I would probably never use it to its full potential. You have to be aware of every possible efficiency gain and trick there is to survive this cutthroat world. And I think it’s great there is some unspoken agreement between miners to not use this technique. The covert operation is the bad part. The fact that you can get some sort of advantage in mining without people knowing about it is the problem. That is why we have the open ledger that isn’t completely obfuscatedcoughzCashcough. The only way trustless ecosystems work is if everyone can tell what is going on in that ecosystem at all times. Sometimes I don’t think people take seriously the risk of state sponsored attacks against Bitcoin. The whole point of the PoW system, AFAIK, was to make attacks against the network not worth the money they would cost. A 20% reduction in this cost is monumental. Huge. Currently, most of us are just gigantic nerds with a new toy to play with to the rest of the world. Not scoffing at what has been accomplished in this space but that is the case. Sure not many people care now, but eventually, if Bitcoin takes off like we all want it to, people are going to start caring. Some of the reasons Bitcoin was even started is a spit in the face of a lot of powerful groups. Not now, but down the line, attacks are almost guaranteed in some way. On a long enough timeline, everyone’s life expectancy hits 0. Look at Venezuela, I believe it is still illegal to own and/or use Bitcoin. Sure that doesn’t affect most of us but that is just one attack. If I remember correctly, the EU is looking to place heavy restrictions on Cryptocurrency. Limiting potential attack vectors such as ASICBOOST is paramount.
I’m not done though. Get that hook away from me.
Scaling. I will always prefer an efficiency gain over a supply gain. I cannot stand the argument that since hardware has been scaling so much that efficient software just gets thrown out the window. Some of the best programming was developed in a time when the hardware wasn’t there yet, and out of that came some software that did amazing things to circumvent the hardware’s shortcomings. We’ve lost that. Video games (I’m a gamer, can’t you tell?) as an example that has lost that. Though not entirely popular, Doom 3 was a marvel technically. It was optimized to the (g)ore. Years later, the graphics of that game held up because it was just so far ahead of its time. Then I play something else and it looks like crap and my beast of a machine can’t run it at 60 frames per second consistently. Optimize your shit fam. SegWit is a very ingenious piece of a solution. It fixes a couple of very important issues in a fairly uncomplicated way. Even I understand the whitepaper. I have little professional programming experience but I know enough to get it. What I don’t like is it being packaged as a “safe” soft fork. It isn’t really that safe. It changes the way transactions are processed and recorded on the blockchain. Enough to where if something were to go wrong, or if something better were to come along, it would be very hard to roll back, if possible at all. That seems dangerous to me. Possibly helpful to the development of Bitcoin, but decidedly not safe. That being said, a safe hard fork just isn’t possible for Bitcoin anymore. ETC came out and didn’t really do much. But they could sell it. It was still worth a lot of money for people who already held a lot of Ethereum. It is still traded today. People are still making money on it. As long as that is still happening, it will still be around. Even if a change is unanimously accepted, to think people won’t mine the old chain is ignorant. Bitcoin is supposed to be immutable but, hey, all of a sudden I can have double my Bitcoin? Would you just look at it? EB/AD seems overly complicated. Just look at the current scaling debate. While mainly politically and economically based, everyone has different opinions on what should be done. To think that “eventually” the ecosystem will come to a majority consensus is foolish. Even if it did, the ability to game the system seems too possible for me. Another possible attack vector. TBH I haven’t read enough into Extension Blocks so fully understand them, same as most people I’m sure. From what I have read, I don’t really trust how complicated it seems. At least even if Lightning Network takes off, the layer 1 blockchain is still available in its basic and efficient glory.
To top this all off we have an issue with Developer Centralization. This should be a genuine concern to everyone. Any sort of centralization is concerning when it comes to this decentralized ledger. We have one not so large group of people who are doing the main programming recently for Bitcoin. The amount of power this entails in the long term is staggering, again assuming Bitcoin gets to the point we all want it to get to. But then here is the issue with this. No one is putting out consistently improving, quality, and innovative code like Core is doing. Classic and XT seems to have stagnated in their innovation department. BU seems like a joke. I read the BUIP001 and it looked like something I wrote. Core put out a roadmap for Schnorr Signatures and I was blown away at the quality of the writing and the future thinking of it, and it was just a roadmap. Some BIPs put out by core are amazing. Sure not all are the best but they definitely try to overthink it on purpose. And for right now, maybe Core being centralized isn’t a bad thing. I haven’t seen anything that would make me believe they were actively trying to hurt Bitcoin. They want it to succeed just as much as we do. Open Source projects are very hard to coordinate. Not all projects have someone like Linus Torvalds who headed the direction of the Linux kernel and probably saved it from falling into obscurity as people fought over what should be included in it. Maybe we need a leader right now. And I haven’t seen anyone step up anywhere close to how Core has.
I thank you for listening to me and my ramblings. I look forward to the discussion this may fuel. I feel I need to do something for Bitcoin, even if it is just this stupid post. I truly believe Crypto is the future, and I’m just excited to be a part of it.
TL;DR IMO: Covert ASICBOOST is a possible attack vector and should be a concern. SegWit is not everything some people make it out to be, but is still better than other solutions. EB/AD would never come to a consensus. More research is required on Extension Blocks. Development being centralized is a concern but, let’s be honest, who else is putting out so much useful and high quality coding? If you don’t agree, fight me.
Edits: I have been corrected that Flexible Transactions came from Bitcoin Classic. Another piece of tech I will have to familiarize myself with. Also, side note, I'm against UASF.
submitted by Linrono to btc [link] [comments]

The best moon map of all time

Check out a video preview here: https://www.twitch.tv/videos/141114181 also check the channel for live streams screenshots: https://discord.gg/BGjPqSr mod list: http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=883521458 https://arkservers.net/serve91.134.213.34:27015 https://discord.gg/UKCujE7 http://steamcommunity.com/groups/heightgaming
Server Wipe - 5/13 XP - 10 Gather - 10 Player levels - 200
why wait for the ark devs to optimize when you can double your framerate just by joining the moon map? for a server restart it takes 6min to show up again, and 3.5min to load mods if you have an ssd or 14min from desktop to character creation screen total is exactly 6gb d/l for all mods engrams have been set to be unlockable without default prerequisites and removed if not high enough tier(no wood or thatch) enough engram points for everything except the 4 worth 250 engram points and the one worth 1000 points at the bottom of the list gamma 2 in day and 3.5 at night tends to help for my setup
New ore and processed mats: titanium, platinum, uranium, silver, gold, copper, nickel, silicon, magnesium, copper ingots, silver ingots, gold ingots, steel ingots, steel plates, coal, coke, powdered coke, steel bolts, glass panels, carbon, carbonite, rubber, seeds(rubber tree, rare flower, rare mushroom, silk, cactus, pumpkin, redwood, essence berry/potion, plant x, stronger plant x, mini redwood, yuca, fungus spore), and more New items: plasma cutter, tek binoculars, medi pack, glider, and more Weapons: blasters, lightsabers, 6 types of turrets, plasma rifles, combistick, whips, smart launcher, fabricated weapon variants, and more Vehicles: Moon Rover, Land Speeder, Naboo Fighter, Speeder Bike, Mech Harvester, Mech Warrior, Mech Turret Drones, Tie Fighter, X-Wing, Puddle Jumper, and more Creatures: 2 unknown alien species, robot ptera, 4 pet robots, many wild tamable creatures, and more Building: 5 mods and most with variants with additional HP Machines: many forges with different abilities, many variants for freezing, cooking, and processing of all types
known bugs: -it can take a long time to load the map, even after you have downloaded the mods and you will often have a frozen or black screen waiting for it to load(see load times above) -turn bitcoin miners off/on each time you log in -sometimes you die while loading in? store things in a box before logging off -there was an issue getting modded mortar and pestle/chem benches to work so you will need to craft those mats(gas, cp, sparkpowder, gunpowder, narco, stim) with the moon mortar pestle -industrial cooker doesn't make genetic meat even with proper ingredients -moments after you move a lot of inventory items, if you are still in the inventory screen, game freezes for a short time and sometimes a long time(few min) -moon pick needs to be [multi] the [solo] version only works in single player -s+ foundation requirement has been extended but some things like doors and crop plots will place, but then disappear after going into 'stasis' if vanilla foundation supports(2 tiles from pillar or foundation) aren't underneath them. -punch needed before whistle
Admin shop currency is bitcoins Items and prices: droid restraining bolt 100 any saddle 100 mindwipe 300 broth of enlightenment 300 land speeder 1000 speeder bike 1800 x wing 3000 tie fighter 3500 naboo fighter 2800 artifact 1000 argy talonx5 100 shark toothx5 100 rex armx5 100 sauropod vertebrax5 100 angler gelx100 150 plasma cutter 100 jedi knight saber 500 jedi master saber 800 sith apprentice saber 500 sith lord saber 800 element pump 2000 lst20 harvest mech 1500 plant species x seed x100 vehicle vaults 1500 tardis 2000 tron bike 1500 LMK if you're looking for anything else
submitted by heightgaming to playarkservers [link] [comments]

OP-ED On Current Concerns In Bitcoin

I have been in the Bitcoin space for a while now. Not exactly an old hat but definitely not exactly a “fledgling” either. I have a couple things to say about the Bitcoin ecosystem, at the moment, that I feel haven’t been talked about enough. Who doesn’t right? You know the old adage, opinions and assholes.
I will start with some of the more recent developments because everyone seems to be up in arms about it. Covert ASICBOOST. Is it good? Should it be killed with software fire? More importantly, cui bono? IMO, attackers. There is no proof that Bitmain is currently running Covert ASICBOOST to get a competitive advantage over other miners. Sure they did implement the chips and/or use ASICBOOST on testnet, but from a hardware development standpoint it makes sense. You want your hardware to be as robust and effective as possible. I want an Intel 6950X to run Speedrunners (2D racing platformer game with low processing need for those not in the know). Sweet hardware, but I would probably never use it to its full potential. You have to be aware of every possible efficiency gain and trick there is to survive this cutthroat world. And I think it’s great there is some unspoken agreement between miners to not use this technique. The covert operation is the bad part. The fact that you can get some sort of advantage in mining without people knowing about it is the problem. That is why we have the open ledger that isn’t completely obfuscatedcoughzCashcough. The only way trustless ecosystems work is if everyone can tell what is going on in that ecosystem at all times. Sometimes I don’t think people take seriously the risk of state sponsored attacks against Bitcoin. The whole point of the PoW system, AFAIK, was to make attacks against the network not worth the money they would cost. A 20% reduction in this cost is monumental. Huge. Currently, most of us are just gigantic nerds with a new toy to play with to the rest of the world. Not scoffing at what has been accomplished in this space but that is the case. Sure not many people care now, but eventually, if Bitcoin takes off like we all want it to, people are going to start caring. Some of the reasons Bitcoin was even started is a spit in the face of a lot of powerful groups. Not now, but down the line, attacks are almost guaranteed in some way. On a long enough timeline, everyone’s life expectancy hits 0. Look at Venezuela, I believe it is still illegal to own and/or use Bitcoin. Sure that doesn’t affect most of us but that is just one attack. If I remember correctly, the EU is looking to place heavy restrictions on Cryptocurrency. Limiting potential attack vectors such as ASICBOOST is paramount.
I’m not done though. Get that hook away from me.
Scaling. I will always prefer an efficiency gain over a supply gain. I cannot stand the argument that since hardware has been scaling so much that efficient software just gets thrown out the window. Some of the best programming was developed in a time when the hardware wasn’t there yet, and out of that came some software that did amazing things to circumvent the hardware’s shortcomings. We’ve lost that. Video games (I’m a gamer, can’t you tell?) as an example that has lost that. Though not entirely popular, Doom 3 was a marvel technically. It was optimized to the (g)ore. Years later, the graphics of that game held up because it was just so far ahead of its time. Then I play something else and it looks like crap and my beast of a machine can’t run it at 60 frames per second consistently. Optimize your shit fam. SegWit is a very ingenious piece of a solution. It fixes a couple of very important issues in a fairly uncomplicated way. Even I understand the whitepaper. I have little professional programming experience but I know enough to get it. What I don’t like is it being packaged as a “safe” soft fork. It isn’t really that safe. It changes the way transactions are processed and recorded on the blockchain. Enough to where if something were to go wrong, or if something better were to come along, it would be very hard to roll back, if possible at all. That seems dangerous to me. Possibly helpful to the development of Bitcoin, but decidedly not safe. That being said, a safe hard fork just isn’t possible for Bitcoin anymore. ETC came out and didn’t really do much. But they could sell it. It was still worth a lot of money for people who already held a lot of Ethereum. It is still traded today. People are still making money on it. As long as that is still happening, it will still be around. Even if a change is unanimously accepted, to think people won’t mine the old chain is ignorant. Bitcoin is supposed to be immutable but, hey, all of a sudden I can have double my Bitcoin? Would you just look at it? EB/AD seems overly complicated. Just look at the current scaling debate. While mainly politically and economically based, everyone has different opinions on what should be done. To think that “eventually” the ecosystem will come to a majority consensus is foolish. Even if it did, the ability to game the system seems too possible for me. Another possible attack vector. TBH I haven’t read enough into Extension Blocks so fully understand them, same as most people I’m sure. From what I have read, I don’t really trust how complicated it seems. At least even if Lightning Network takes off, the layer 1 blockchain is still available in its basic and efficient glory.
To top this all off we have an issue with Developer Centralization. This should be a genuine concern to everyone. Any sort of centralization is concerning when it comes to this decentralized ledger. We have one not so large group of people who are doing the main programming recently for Bitcoin. The amount of power this entails in the long term is staggering, again assuming Bitcoin gets to the point we all want it to get to. But then here is the issue with this. No one is putting out consistently improving, quality, and innovative code like Core is doing. Classic and XT seems to have stagnated in their innovation department. BU seems like a joke. I read the BUIP001 and it looked like something I wrote. Core put out a roadmap for Schnorr Signatures and I was blown away at the quality of the writing and the future thinking of it, and it was just a roadmap. Some BIPs put out by core are amazing. Sure not all are the best but they definitely try to overthink it on purpose. And for right now, maybe Core being centralized isn’t a bad thing. I haven’t seen anything that would make me believe they were actively trying to hurt Bitcoin. They want it to succeed just as much as we do. Open Source projects are very hard to coordinate. Not all projects have someone like Linus Torvalds who headed the direction of the Linux kernel and probably saved it from falling into obscurity as people fought over what should be included in it. Maybe we need a leader right now. And I haven’t seen anyone step up anywhere close to how Core has.
I thank you for listening to me and my ramblings. I look forward to the discussion this may fuel. I feel I need to do something for Bitcoin, even if it is just this stupid post. I truly believe Crypto is the future, and I’m just excited to be a part of it.
TL;DR IMO: Covert ASICBOOST is a possible attack vector and should be a concern. SegWit is not everything some people make it out to be, but is still better than other solutions. EB/AD would never come to a consensus. More research is required on Extension Blocks. Development being centralized is a concern but, let’s be honest, who else is putting out so much useful and high quality coding? If you don’t agree, fight me.
Edits: I have been corrected that Flexible Transactions came from Bitcoin Classic. Another piece of tech I will have to familiarize myself with. Also, side note, I'm against UASF.
submitted by Linrono to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

GW2 Daily - Ascalon Miner How to sell 5 ores for 40000 Space Mining Tycoon 25$/h Ore Mining on the Ethereum Blockchain with the Gorn Hegemony CSC Guild Mining Simulator Android Gameplay [31] The Actually Additions Mining Lens - All the Mods Expert  Breakfastcraft

The Bitcoin.com mining pool has the lowest share reject rate (0.15%) we've ever seen. Other pools have over 0.30% rejected shares. Furthermore, the Bitcoin.com pool has a super responsive and reliable support team. Ore-Mine is a very simple web-based game where you mine ore and can sell it for Bitcoins, the game is absolutely free to get started up and running with a small production capacity and as you advance you can increase your ore production and earnings as well. As with most other similar games apart from being able to play for free, you can invest some coins to increase your ore production rate ... RollerCoin is the first online bitcoin mining simulator game ☛ Start Playing Now! ☚ Earn real bitcoins while enjoying the game and competing with your friends. ore-mine.org - Loading... Ore-Mine is a very simple web-based game where you mine ore and can sell it for Bitcoins, the game is absolutely free to get started up and running with a small production capacity and as you advance you can increase your ore production and earnings as well. As with most other similar games apart from being able to play for free, you can invest some coins to increase your ore production rate ...

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GW2 Daily - Ascalon Miner

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